Green New Deal

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The world is stepping up to tackle climate crisis 

The world is on track for 3oC of global warming. To avoid the most severe impacts of a changing climate, we must work together to limit warming to 1.5oC. Globally, we need to get to net-zero emissions by 2050.

The City of Ithaca is answering the call to action

The Ithaca Green New Deal was adopted unanimously by the City of Ithaca Common Council on June 5, 2019 to address climate change, economic inequality, and racial injustice.

The Ithaca Green New Deal has two huge goals

  • Achieve carbon-neutrality community-wide by 2030
  • Ensure benefits are shared among all local communities to reduce historical social and economic inequities

To meet these goals, we will take early actions...

Lead by Example
The City has adopted these goals for city government operations:

  • Meet the electricity needs of government operations with 100% renewable electricity by 2025
  • Reduce emissions from the City vehicle fleet by 50% by 2025

Create a Green New Deal Action Plan

The City will facilitate a comprehensive public engagement process to co-create the plan for our community to achieve the Green New Deal goals. The City has committed to assign additional staff and resources to create and implement the plan through the 2020 City budget process.

Update: The City has applied for a $100,000 grant from New York State, which would be matched by the City, to create a GND Action Plan. The creation of new sustainability staff positions is currently being discussed as part of the 2020 budget process.

Adopt a Green Building Code for New Buildings

A new local energy code is expected to be in place by the end of 2019 that will require all new buildings in Ithaca to produce 40% fewer greenhouse gas emissions than required by state code. Net-zero emissions on new construction will be required by 2030. 

Update: The August 8, 2019 draft Ithaca Energy Code Supplement is now being circulated for public comment. Your comments are respectfully requested prior to September 30, 2019. Download project documents and learn more at  www.ithacagreenbuilding.com/

Adopt a Green Building Code for Existing Buildings

The City will enact legislation to reduce emissions in existing buildings by 2021.

Here's what you can do!

The Green New Deal is inspiring, it's daunting, and it cannot be achieved without you! As we gear up to meet the challenge, here is what you can do...
Spread the word: Tell your friends and family about the Green New Deal.
Share your thoughts: We want to hear from you! Click here to give us feedback
Learn more: Review the resources below
Stay tuned: Check this website regularly for the latest updates and ways you can get involved. 

Resources:

The Green New Deal resolution, passed unanimously by Ithaca's Common Council on June 5, 2019, addresses climate change mitigation, as well as economic inequality and racial injustice. The City, in conjunction with extensive input from the Ithaca community from the Ithaca community, will co-create a Green New Deal action plan in 2020 to achieve the goals laid out.

This online form (link below) is one opportunity for you to give your input. We want to hear your ideas, your critiques, and your comments. We will be using them as a springboard to start the conversation surrounding the Ithaca Green New Deal and the community engagement process. The information you share will be kept confidential and anonymous.
Share your thoughts on the Green New Deal here

Ithaca Green New Deal Summary

Video of the June 5, 2019 Common Council Meeting

Photos: The City of Ithaca has earned Bronze certification through the Climate Smart Communities program
             Electric vehicle chargers are available at no cost in all city parking garages (except Green Street)
             Rooftop solar- or community solar, if your home or business is shaded- can be a great way to save money and reduce green house gas emissions.
             The TREE Common House at EcoVillage Ithaca is close to net-zero carbon, yet construction costs were 5% less than typical similar buildings.
             (Photo Credit: Learn@EcoVillage.Ithaca)